Is there an alcoholic drink that wont give me acid reflux?

  • Discussion
  •  johnjoe from Foodary #24



    I just found your site and it looks really good.

    I am trying to find an alcoholic drink that won’t give me acid reflux as I am going to Rhodes in Greece to my daughter’s wedding and don’t want to be a killjoy on the bachelors night.


    Which is the Best Alcoholic Drink for Acid Reflux?
    Do all alcoholic drinks cause heartburn?
  •  Anthony Coleman #320

    Your personal tolerance for alcohol will be difference from others. You have to Keep track of your own response to various Alcoholic drinks. This is the only way to discover which Alcoholic drinks you can best tolerate and which drinks triggers acid reflux

    •  Keith Taylor #355
      Ŧallars: Ŧ 1,060.98

      Wise words, Anthony.

      I’d like to extend the personal profile on this forum, as I have on other health websites. However, I’m still thinking about what fields to add for data. My other project was relatively easy, as it dealt with only one disease. On Foodary, I want to widen the scope, and look at healthy eating related to any disease.

      In this case, we’re talking about acid reflux, and alcohol. Now I know nothing about acid reflux, though I am good at research. I can probably find the basic facts, but would need other people to tell me what the main issues are.

      But, as you say, alcohol is a personal issue. Any sensible discussion must start with the amount of alcohol being consumed. JohnJoe never gave me that information, so I could never really help much. Perhaps now, I can.

      Whatever the case, it is essential, as you say, to keep track of intake and responses. That is what the personal profile is for, when you log in to this forum.

      Irrespective of any admin changes I might make, the most important thing is to take a personal approach to any health/food issue. It starts with facts about specific health conditions, symptoms and treatment. Only then can we investigate and consider what dietary effects might be.

      In this case, I would need to know if a doctor had diagnosed acid reflux. Assuming yes, I would need to know more about the specific person’s symptoms, and any current treatment. Additional information about treatments and outcomes tried in the past is always useful.

      Only then can we consider how alcohol affects acid reflux symptoms.

      As you say, Anthony, it has to be personal, because what suits one person might not suit another.

  •  Keith Taylor #565
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 1,060.98



    Acid reflux and heartburn or indigestion are hot topics at the moment. So, I’m publishing some new research into acid reflux and diet soon. Because it highlights the need to consider 2 extremely important points:

    1) You must consider the type of acid reflux you are suffering. Because different types of acid reflux have different dietary needs.

    2) You must consider your total diet, not just alcohol, or a few types of drinks. Because different foods affect acid reflux in different ways. Therefore, it is vital to start with a good healthy foundation diet that does not normally irritate digestive processes. Then carefully isolate personal trigger foods that cause acid reflux. So that you can replace your trigger foods with suitable substitutes while maintaining healthy nutrition balance.

    So, to ensure you get notified when I publish new information about acid reflux, subscribe to my update service:

    Enter your email address:

    Subscription is free and your email address is safe - I will never share it with anyone else.

    For personal nutrition help: Healthy Eating Forum.

  •  Wine Worrier #591

    Wine has an acidic pH. Those with reflux should avoid more acidic ethanol. Wine is not alkaline.

  •  Keith Taylor #594
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 1,060.98

    Wine has an alkalizing effect on the body (i.e. it has a negative acid load on the kidneys which means the PRAL calculation is negative. So for most people, an alkaline diet including moderate wine consumption is helpful. But this has nothing to do with pH, which is a physical test of the chemical properties of wine. Most wine falls into the pH range 3 to 4, so it is acidic in the bottle, but alkaline in the body.

    More importantly, acid reflux is a range of conditions where the less common forms can be affected by pH. But, most acid reflux sufferers do not need to consider the pH of food and drink. If you want to discuss acid reflux, you should be very clear about the specific type of acid reflux that is affecting you. So get a proper diagnosis from your doctor first. Because different types of acid reflux need different treatments and different diets

You should log in to Foodary to create a new topic.


If you do not want to log in, you can create a new topic via the red Food Help button, or raise a new Foodary helpdesk ticket.